Guns, Gams & Gumshoes

A defense attorney & PI who also happen to be writers

  • Writing a Sleuth?

    A Guide for Writing Fictional Sleuths from a Couple of Real-Life Sleuths

    "How to Write a Dick is the best work of its kind I’ve ever come across because it covers the whole spectrum in an entertaining style that will appeal to layman and lawmen alike."

    Available on Kindle

  • Copyright Notices

    All rights reserved by Colleen Collins and Shaun Kaufman. Any use of the content on this site (including images owned by Colleen Collins and/or Shaun Kaufman) requires specific, written authority. Any violations of this reservation will result in legal action.

    It has come to our attention that people are illegally copying and using the black and white private eye at a keyboard image that is used on our site. NOTE: This image is protected by copyright, property of Colleen Collins.

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Case Story: The Spied-Upon Spy

Posted by Writing PIs on June 16, 2017

A Homeland Security federal agent (whom we’ll call “B”) was on her first day of vacation in Cripple Creek, Colorado, a historic town where gambling is legal. B had played slot machines throughout the day, followed by dinner with her spouse, after which she played more slot machines.

The Arrest

Around 9:30 p.m., a state of Colorado gaming officer approached her while she was playing, and asked her to please step away from the machine. The gaming officer informed B that a casino security camera had taken footage of her cheating at a slot machine within the past hour.

When B asked for specifics, the gaming officer said that a security camera had captured video of B observing a player walk away from a machine without pressing the “Cash Out” button. B immediately sat down at that machine and started playing that slot machine, therefore stealing the previous person’s money.

B was surprised, said she had no idea there had been money left in the machine when she sat down to play, and hadn’t the camera also captured B putting in her own coupon to play?

Gaming officer claimed client had stolen another customer’s gambling coupon (image in public domain)

The gaming officer remained adamant that B was under arrest for thieving a game device, a class 6 felony in Colorado. Being a federal agent, B knew it was wise for her to remain silent, and peacefully allowed the officer to arrest, cuff, and take B to jail.

Lawyer Enters the Case

Within hours after being arrested, B posted bond, and returned with her spouse to their home state. A month later, after reviewing the Colorado division of gaming reports about her arrest, B decided to hire a Colorado defense lawyer and contacted Colorado defense attorney Shaun Kaufman (one of the authors of this blog).

Note: If B, a Homeland Security federal agent, were to be found guilty, she would automatically lose her security clearance and job, in which she’d accrued 18 years. By the way, the government doesn’t differentiate between a misdemeanor or felony—if an employee is found guilty of either one, they lose their job.

Defense Investigation

The defense investigator, Colleen (the other author of this blog), conducted surveillance in the casino regarding security practices for machines, and learned that casino security was lax in regard to reminding players—either by signs or verbally—to remember to take their money coupons before leaving slot machines.

D.A.’s Case: Intention

Shaun drove three times, back and forth, to Cripple Creek (229 miles each round trip) to meet with the D.A. Third time was the charm as he finally agreed to dismiss the charges based on the prosecution’s inability to prove B’s intent to steal.

Guns, Gams, and Gumshoes Ranked #3 in Top PI Blogs

Thank you, PINow, for ranking Guns, Gams, & Gumshoes as #3 in the top 10 private investigator blogs for 2017.

All rights reserved by Colleen Collins and Shaun Kaufman. Any use of the content requires specific, written authority. Please do not copy or distribute any images unless they are noted as being in the public domain, thank you.

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Book Giveaway for Gums Gams Gumshoes 8-year-blogiversary

Posted by Writing PIs on June 9, 2017

Thank you, readers, for visiting us over the last 8 years!

A lot’s happened since 2009, from Guns, Gams, and Gumshoes getting tapped twice by the American Library Association’s Booklist site as its “Web Crush of the Week” during Mystery Month (2011 & 2014), to teaching courses to fiction writers at national conferences, to writing a handful of nonfiction books about private investigations and the law.

Blogiversary Book Giveaway

Click on book cover to go to Amazon page

To celebrate our 8-year blogiversary, we’re giving away 8 copies of How Do Private Eyes Do That?, a nonfiction book written by one of the Writing PIs, Colleen Collins.

Click Here to Enter

“A must-have for any writer serious about crafting authentic private eyes. Collins knows her stuff.” ~Lori Wilde, New York Times and USA Today bestselling author

It’s an Amazon ebook, but you don’t need a Kindle to read it. Amazon provides a free, easy-to-download app that makes the book readable on a variety of platforms, from your browser to your computer (PC or MAC), even your smartphone.

Giveaway ends Jun 24, 2017 11:59 PM PDT, or when all prizes are claimed. No purchase necessary.

Have a great weekend, Writing PIs

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Private Eye Writers of America: 2017 Shamus Award Finalists

Posted by Writing PIs on June 8, 2017

Winners will be announced this October at the Private Eye Writers of America (PWA) Banquet at Bouchercon in Toronto, Canada. Congratulations to all the nominees!

PRIVATE EYE WRITERS OF AMERICA SHAMUS AWARD NOMINEES 2017
(For works published in 2016)

The below lists of nominees are in alphabetical order by author.

Best Original Private Eye Paperback

Michael Craven, The Detective and the Chinese High-Fin. Harper Collins
O’Neil De Noux,  Hold Me, Babe. Big Kiss Publications
Erle Stanley Gardner,  The Knife Slipped. Hard Case Crime
Vaseem Khan, The Perplexing Theft of the Jewel in the Crown. Red Hook Books
Manuel Ramos, My Bad. Arte Publico Press

Best First Private Eye Novel

Tim Baker, Fever City. Europa Editions
Joe Ide, IQ.  Little, Brown
L.P. Lyle, Deep Six. Oceanview Publishing
David Swinson, The Second Girl. Little, Brown
Richard Vine, Soho Sins. Hard Case Crime

Best Private Eye Short Story

Lawrence Block, “Keller’s Fedora” (e-publication)
Brendan DuBois, “A Battlefield Reunion in AHMM, June
Ake Edwardson, “Stairway From Heaven” in Stockholm Noir, Akashic
Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins, “A Dangerous Cat” in The Strand. Feb-May
Dave Zeltserman, “Archie On Loan” in EQMM, Sept.-Oct.

Best Private Eye Novel

Reed Farrel Coleman, Where It Hurts. Putnam
Lindsey Davis, The Graveyard of the Hesperides. Minotaur
Timothy Hallinan, Fields Where They Lay. Soho Crime
Al Lamanda, With 6 You Get Wally. Gale Cengage
Robert S. Levinson, The Stardom Affair.  Five Star

All images are licensed by Colleen Collins, who does not have legal authority to share with others, so please do not copy or distribute any images, thank you.

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Pikes Peak Writers Conference 2017: Half-Day Workshop on Private Investigations

Posted by Writing PIs on April 22, 2017

On Thursday, April 27, 2017, the Writing PIs, Shaun Kaufman & Colleen Collins, are presenting a half-day workshop at the Pikes Peak Writers Conference. These “prequel” workshops are for one day only, prior to the official start of the conference on Friday, April 28, 2017. Attendees may register for these prequel workshops separately, or add the prequel workshops to their regular conference registration.

To register: PPWC Prequel Programming

Below is the syllabus for our workshop.

Misdemeanors to Murder: Nothing but the Truth from a Criminal Lawyer & Private Eye

Prequel Afternoon Session #4

Shaun Kaufman and Colleen CollinsPresented by Colleen Collins and Shaun Kaufman

“Misdemeanors to Murder: Nothing but the Truth from a Criminal Lawyer and Private Eye” covers the history of private eyes, popular misconceptions of PIs, types of investigators, tricks of the trade, crime scenes, the relationship between PIs and police, legalities, and breakdowns of real-life investigative/criminal cases. At the end of presentation will be a Q&A.

At the end of the workshop, there will be a drawing for copies of our nonfiction books How Do Private Eyes Do That? and A Lawyer’s Primer for Writers: From Crimes to Courtrooms.

Syllabus

  1. Introduction
  2. History of the Private Eye
  3. Types of Private Investigators: One Size Doesn’t Fit All
  4. Misconceptions About PIs: Don’t Let Your PI Character Become a Cliché
  5. Tricks of the Trade: Trash Hits, Spy Gear, Apps & More
  6. Breaking the Law: Don’t Make Your PI-Character Look Like a Legal Dummy
  7. PIs and Police: Debunking Myths
  8. PIs and Crime Scenes: Cold Crime Scenes vs. “Hot” Crime Scenes
  9. Examples of Real-Life Investigative Cases: Breakdown of PI’s Tasks (Misdemeanors to Attempted Homicide)
  10. Examples of Real-Life Criminal Litigation Cases: Breakdown of Defense Lawyer’s & PI’s Tasks (Misdemeanors to Murder 1)
  11. Research Sources for Writers: PI Blogs, Websites, Online Magazines
  12. Q&A

All rights reserved by Colleen Collins and Shaun Kaufman. Any use of the content requires specific, written authority. All images are either copyrighted or licensed by the authors, who do not have legal authority to share with others, so please do not copy or distribute any images, thank you.

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Book Sale: How Do Private Eyes Do That?

Posted by Writing PIs on April 10, 2017

Click on cover to go to Amazon page

How Do Private Eyes Do That? by Colleen Collins, one of the Writing PIs, is on sale for $1.99 (regular price $5.95) through April 14. Click on the cover to go to the Amazon page.

Book Topics

Subjects include:

  • History of the private eye
  • Public vs. private investigators
  • Several dozen articles covering investigative techniques, complex investigations and other case studies, pop culture private eyes, and more
  • Links to PI blogs, online magazines, and websites
  • Glossary of PI terms.

Praise for How Do Private Eyes Do That?

“A must-have for any writer serious about crafting authentic private eyes. Collins knows her stuff.” ~Lori Wilde, New York Times and USA Today bestselling author

“If you’re looking for the lowdown on private investigations, this is it.” ~Bill Crider, author of the Truman Smith mystery series
“I am an attorney who uses PIs from time to time. This is a great book that details the mentality of PIs.” ~G. McFadden, attorney
“I picked my copy up as a whim to flesh out the background of my own fictional PI and, after reading the book, trashed just about everything I had written. It is a spectacular bargain. It will help sweep out misconceptions, empty the waste bin of trite, worn out clichés, and give you plenty of room for fresh ideas. Man, it’ll save your life.” ~C.M. Briggs, writer
To download your copy, click here. No Kindle? No problem. Amazon offers free apps for reading Kindle books on your browser, computer (both PCs and Macs), and a variety of other devices.

All rights reserved by Colleen Collins. Any use of the content requires specific, written authority. All images are either copyrighted or licensed by the author, who does not have legal authority to share with others, so please do not copy or distribute any images, thank you.

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Senate Resolution May Eventually Allow ISPs to Sell Sensitive Customer Data

Posted by Writing PIs on March 23, 2017

Browsing History and Your Privacy

March 23, 2017: Today the Senate passed a resolution that would overturn an FCC rule that requires internet service providers (ISPs) to get customers’ permission before ISPs sell sensitive consumer data, such as browsing histories. You can read more in the LA Times article Senate votes to kill privacy rules meant to protect people’s sensitive data from their Internet providers.

Mystery writers often joke that if the government ever looked at their browsing histories for stories, the writer would look like he/she wanted to murder someone through his/her searches on poisoning, bombing, knifing, strangling, and on and on…

But it’s not so funny that a Minnesota judge recently approved a warrant to retrieve people’s Google searches on variations of a victim’s name over a 5-week timeframe. Google was to provide the court each searcher’s name, email address, account information, and IP address. Think about that. What if you had Googled a name of a second cousin, a potential employer, even the name of a character in a book, and what you typed just happened to be similar to that victim’s name? Your name and personal information would be provided to the court as a possible suspect.

But, there’s no need to panic. Instead…

Be Proactive with Your Internet Privacy

The Senate’s resolution hasn’t gone to legislation yet, of course. So this is an opportunity to think about ways to protect your internet privacy and browsing history. For example, are you using a private search engine? Good. If not, consider using a private search engine like DuckDuckGo or StartPage.

Articles on Internet Privacy

Some private search engines, such as StartPage, also encourage users to take additional steps to limit cookies as a second line of defense. I wrote about how to set up Do Not Track options, add-ons, extensions, and more in my article Tips for Keeping the Cookie Monster Out of Your Browser.

Below are more articles that offer tips for protecting your internet privacy:

How to Browse the Internet Anonymously by Natasha Stokes (Techlicious)

One setting to protect your privacy on your iPhone or iPad by Mark Jones (Komando.com)

Computer security tips for whistleblowers and sources (The Guardian)

Have a good week, Writing PIs

 All rights reserved by Colleen Collins. Any use of the content requires specific, written authority. All images are licensed by the author, who does not have legal authority to share with others so please do not copy or distribute those images, thank you.

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International Women’s Day: Honoring Female Investigators

Posted by Writing PIs on March 8, 2017

International Women’s Day has been observed since the early 1900s. On this day, thousands of events occur around the world to celebrate women and their accomplishments.

For International Women’s Day, I’m honoring several women PIs through articles written about them to radio shows hosted by them. This post isn’t meant to be all-inclusive by any means, just a cross-section of outstanding women investigators, including their fictional counterparts.

Radio Shows: New and Old

Below are two radio shows, one hosted by a contemporary female PI, the other about a old-time radio female private eye.

PI’s Declassified

California PI Francie Kohler hosts this weekly Internet radio show where she interviews private investigators and other professionals in associated fields. The show airs every Thursday at 9 a.m. Pacific Time: PI’s Declassified.

Old-Time Radio: Candy Matson Yukon 2-8209cover ebook 2000px longest side

This old-time radio show kicked off in 1949. Every show opened with a ringing telephone with a female answering, “Candy Matson, YU 2-8209,” after which the theme song “Candy” played. According to the Internet Archive, Old Time Radio (OTR) researchers view this radio show as the best of the female private eyes. It ran until 1951. Listen to single episodes here: Candy Matson YUkon 2-8209.

Articles About Real-Life Female Private Investigators

Possible sketch of Kate Warne, the first U.S. female PI

Possible sketch of Kate Warne, the first U.S. female PI

Below is a sampling of articles written about female PIs:

The First U.S. Female Private Eye: Kate Warne (The Zen Man)

Q&A: Norma Tillman–Right and Wrong (Pursuit Magazine)

What Does It Take to Be an International Private Eye (interview with international private investigator Yin Johnson and her husband Phil, via RC Bridgestock Blog)

The PI Wears Prada: One Woman’s Midlife Career Change (What’s Next)

What Is It Like Being a Female Private Investigator? (The Zen Man)

This Private Investigator is One of the Few Jersey Women Working as Sleuths (NJ.com)

Articles About Fictional Female Private Eyes

There are many entertaining female “eyes” in literature, going back to the mid 1800s.

Dangerous Dames: A Timeline of Some of the Significant Female Eyes (The Thrilling Detective – if you haven’t checked out The Thrilling Detective, you’re missing out on one of the most comprehensive and entertaining sites about fictional private eyes on the ‘net)

Female Private Eyes in Fiction: From Lady Detectives to Hard-Boiled Dames (by Guns, Gams & Gumshoes’s Colleen for Festivale magazine)

Did you know a well-known writer of private eye novels based a female PI character on a real one? Check out the interview “Susan Daniels: If Sam Spade Had Been Samantha – Cleveland’s Female Private Eye”

Have a great week, Writing PIs

Click on cover to go to Amazon page

Click on cover to go to Amazon page

“As an experienced private detective and a skilled storyteller, Colleen Collins is the perfect person to offer a glimpse into the lives of real female P.I.s”
~ Kim Green, managing editor of Pursuit Magazine: The Magazine of Professional Investigators

 

All rights reserved by Colleen Collins. Any use of the content requires specific, written authority.

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The Witness Who Came in from the Cold

Posted by Writing PIs on February 23, 2017

black-white-woman-along-at-table-drinking-gratisograph-ryan-mcguire

(Image courtesy of Ryan McGuire)

We worked this case as an investigative team, with our results helping a defense lawyer to obtain a dismissal for his client. Also, we worked this case the old-fashioned way, on foot, as a key witness was afraid for her identity to be traced digitally (email, phone, etc.).

Late One Summer Night…

…a resident in a home near a park called 911 after hearing sounds of yelling and fighting (the caller couldn’t see the park itself as the view was obstructed by other homes). When police arrived at the park, they found three local gang members with knife wounds, lying on the ground. The gang members said two rival gang members from another city had stabbed them. One ran away, whereabouts unknown. The other had flagged down a car for a ride (they gave the license plate and description of that car.) Police found no weapons on the three gang members—it was later learned that others in their gang had gathered all the weapons and left before the police arrived.

Charge: Felony 3, First-Degree Assault

Police found the described car parked at a home in the neighborhood. The driver admitted he’d given a ride to a young man (whom we’ll call “E”), who had flagged him down and asked for a lift to a friend’s home. The police went to that address and found E, who matched the description given by the stabbed gang members.

handcuffed-hands

With no witnesses to confirm E’s claim of self-defense, police arrested him (image licensed by Colleen Collins)

Although E claimed self-defense, saying the rival gang had harassed, punched, and threatened him with their weaponry, the police charged him with the stabbings, a felony 3, first-degree assault.

Following the code of gang members, E refused to give any information about his fellow gang member who’d run away (later we learned this gang member had returned to his car and driven back to the neighboring city that night).

Goal: Find a Witness

E hired a defense lawyer (for whom we worked as defense investigators at the time). The lawyer informed the court and opposing counsel that our client was claiming self-defense.

Because E refused to identify his fellow gang member, the case lacked an independent corroborating witness. Based on the 911 call, people in the neighborhood had obviously heard the fighting, but no one had yet come forward to say that E had fought in self-defense.

As investigators we could have driven to the neighboring city and tried to root out this gang-member-witness—yeah, that would have been an easy, fruitful enterprise (not).

Bottom line: we had one weapon, the old “neighborhood canvas” or knock and talk.

Fear of Gang Retaliation

Problem was, people didn’t want to talk. An elderly man confided that people were afraid to talk out of fear of gang retaliation.

Next, we printed posters asking anyone who had seen an incident on [date] and [park name] to call [phone number], and the conversation would remain confidential. Whenever we’ve posted flyers like this, we use a dedicated, virtual phone number (meaning we set up a unique number that can’t be traced, and rings through to one of our office phones).

Then we walked up and down the sidewalks of this east Denver gang-infested, lower middle-class neighborhood, sticking our posters on street light poles, the fence around the park, and other such public spots (didn’t leave any on people’s doors as we didn’t want any third parties later assuming so-and-so, who had had a flyer on their door, was probably the snitch).

The Clock Was Ticking

Days later, we began to panic. E had to decide on a 5- to 12-year prison-only plea offer in the coming week, and no one had called us.

One late afternoon, we got a call from a coffee shop phone number in a different part of the city. The caller identified herself as a mother who lived near the park, but refused to give her name, or any digital means of contacting her (email address, cell phone number, etc.) as she was afraid of being traced. She said she’d seen local gang members threatening and taunting E, who at first had run from them, but after being cornered, fought back in self-defense. She wanted to do the right thing and “help that young man.”

A Secret Night Meeting

black-and-white-forest-light

The witness met us in the park shadows (image courtesy of Ryan McGuire)

She agreed to meet us in the park, at night, and point out where the young men had fought. We arrived at the park one weekday night and waited. An older woman walked toward us from a corner of the park.

In the shadows, she pointed out where she’d seen E running from the others, and where E had ended up with his back to a fence. We gave her our lawyer’s card and asked her to call him, and that the lawyer would protect her identity by sealing her statement in the court file.

D.A. Reviews Investigative Report

With a reliable, independent witness supporting E’s story, the defense lawyer took our interview and case report to the prosecution, who agreed to dismiss the charges against E.

All rights reserved by Colleen Collins and Shaun Kaufman, and any use of the content requires specific, written authority. Please do not copy/distribute mages licensed by Colleen Collins as she does not have the authority to share with others. All other images are in the public domain, with the caveat by the photographer, Ryan McGuire, to please credit them with his name.

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2017 Shamus Awards, Private Eye Writers of America: Submissions Now Open

Posted by Writing PIs on January 11, 2017

fedora black and white

PRIVATE EYE WRITERS OF AMERICA ACCEPTING SUBMISSIONS

FOR 2017 SHAMUS AWARDS

For Works First Published in the U.S. in 2016

Following are the categories for the Private Eye Writers of America 2017 Shamus Awards for private eye novels and short stories first published in the United States in 2016.  The awards will be presented in the fall of 2017 at Bouchercon.

DEADLINE: Submissions must be postmarked by March 31, 2017. No extensions can be given.

Shamus Committees will forward their final list to the Shamus Awards Chair by May 31, 2017.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible works must feature as a main character a person PAID for investigative work but NOT employed for that work by a unit of government.  These include traditionally licensed private investigators; lawyers and reporters who do their own investigations; and others who function as hired private agents.  These do NOT include law enforcement officers, other government employees or amateur, uncompensated sleuths.

Independently published books (Indies) may be submitted to the Best Original Paperback PI Novel category.

SUBMISSIONS; Please send one copy of each eligible work to ALL members of the appropriate committee. Do NOT submit a book to more than one committee.

There is no application fee and no submission form, as a simple cover letter will suffice. If you have any questions, please e-mail Gay Toltl Kinman at gaykinman@gaykinman.com BEFORE submitting.

BEST HARDCOVER PI NOVEL: A book-length work of fiction published in hardcover in 2016 that is NOT the author’s first published P.I. novel.

BEST FIRST PI NOVEL: A book-length work of fiction, in hardcover or paperback, first published in 2016 that is the author’s first published novel featuring a private investigator as a main character.

BEST ORIGINAL PAPERBACK PI NOVEL: A book-length work of fiction first published as a paperback original in 2016 that is NOT the author’s first P.I. novel. Paperback reprints of previously published novels are NOT eligible.

BEST PI SHORT STORY: A work of fiction of 20,000 words or fewer.  Stories first published in an earlier year and reprinted in a magazine, anthology or collection in 2016, are NOT eligible.

(If you’re interested in submitting for a category, please contact Gay Toltl Kinman at gaykinman@gaykinman.com for the mailing address)

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Don’t Make Hiring a Private Eye One of Your New Year’s Resolutions

Posted by Writing PIs on January 7, 2017

We once got a call from a woman who wanted to know how her abusive ex-boyfriend had learned her new home address. We ran a quick search of her address on Google, and guess what? She’d listed it on an online resume, which meant anybody could find that home address by simply searching for her name.

Let’s go over a few resolutions you can make to protect your confidential information so you don’t need to add “Hire a Private Investigator” to that list.

Tip #1: Stop sharing your home address

It’s your home, your private residence, the center of your family life — you don’t need to share this address with anybody other than friends, family and trusted business contacts. One way to protect your home address is to provide your business address instead.

Another way to protect your home address is to purchase a private mailbox from a US post office, or from a private mailbox service such as The UPS Store, then use this address on forms, registrations, mailings, and so on. Private mailbox companies often provide you with a “street” address (where your mailbox is the suite number) so those forms that say “You must enter a street address, not a post office box” will be satisfied that you’re entering a street address (although it’s not).

Tip #2: Don’t announce your location

Turn off location services on your smartphones

Turn off location services on your smartphone

It’s all the rage for people to automatically announce their location through social media sites (such as Twitter) and other online sites. If someone has decided to break into your residence, or confront you, or confront somebody who’s still at your residence (while you’re at your location), or conduct some other not-in-your-best-interest activity, don’t help them by letting them know your location. So when you see those prompts (“Click here so people can know your location!”) don’t click.

Also, it’s a good idea to turn off location services on your smartphone so you are not giving away your real-time location. Also, photos you take with your smartphone can record your location via embedded geotagging. This 2014 article in Forbes, Don’t Let Stalkers, Abusers, and Creeps Track Your Phones Location, contains instructions for turning off location services.

Tip #3: Don’t give out your phone number

It's possible to track a person's address via their phone number

Did you know that it’s possible to track a person’s address via their phone number?

It’s relatively easy to find home addresses from phone numbers. It’s just as easy for you to protect that number, and your personal information associated with it, by using a virtual phone number. What’s that? A virtual number is a regular number (area code + number, such as 123-456-7789) that you can set up to ring through to your real number. Then, you give out the virtual number when a stranger, or someone other than family and trusted friends, asks for your phone number. When somebody calls that virtual number, you answer, and nobody knows it’s not your real number.

If someone attempts a trace on that phone number (to find the name/address it’s registered to), they won’t find it (that is, as long as you haven’t posted your name as being associated with that number somewhere on the Internet). Basic virtual number services typically cost anywhere from $6.95 to $10.95 a month (extra features, such as fax services, cost more). You can sign up for a virtual number at sites like Vumber and our personal favorite, Phone.com.

That’s it.  Three tips to protect your confidential information in the new year.


Like this article? It and other investigative articles by this author are in How Do Private Eyes Do That?

All rights reserved by Colleen Collins, and any use of the content requires specific, written authority.All images in this article are licensed by the author, who does not have the authority to share with others, so please do not copy, distribute, or otherwise use any of these images.

Posted in Don't Make Hiring a PI One of Your New Year's Resolutions, Finding Names Behind Phone Numbers, Nonfiction book: HOW DO PRIVATE EYES DO THAT? | Tagged: , , , , | Comments Off on Don’t Make Hiring a Private Eye One of Your New Year’s Resolutions

 
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